IAJGS Conference Warsaw 2018

We are very pleased to inform you that the following proposal has been accepted for presentation at the 38th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Warsaw, Poland from August 5 -10, 2018.

Schedule
2018 Conference Schedule
Abtract #1
The Partisan Song Project and Genealogy – Inspiring and Connecting a New Generation

“Zog Nit Keynmol” is the anthem of Holocaust survivors. It is a legacy that is in danger of soon dying out. The Partisan Song Project is an initiative to connect it to the next generation through meaning, context, and family histories.

This multi-media presentation follows the path of the project from its genesis in January 2017:

the initial request from a school for information;

my research methodology and content;

my “out of the box” teaching style to 1000 students;

planning and running a separate online class with five schools in the FSU and hosted by a sixth;

introducing family history to the program;

working with more schools;

spreading the message via social media, Holocaust centres and survivors;

going global with the support of World ORT; HET UK, TEC Lithuania, Yad Vashem; and

the case study of Oscar Borecki, a Bielski Partisan from Novogrudok and commemorating his legacy in Australia.

Handout

Warsaw Handout 1
Abstract #2

Back From the Polish and Litvak Diaspora: Virtual Journeys That Connect Us To Our Roots.

Back From the Polish and Litvak Diaspora: Virtual Journeys That Connect Us To Our Roots.

My first heritage visit to Poland and the Baltics was in 2011. I have returned six times since, accumulating a wealth of information, photos, stories and contacts.

In this multimedia presentation find out why and how we gather and share this data with others in mind; and why we include both past and contemporary Jewish Life.

I will help you grasp the importance of the web using the following tools, drawing on some examples:

JewishGen KehilaLinks – my 80 KehilaLinks (35 Lithuania, 7 Poland, 6 Belarus, others in Latvia, Germany, Russia, Estonia, China, Africa and Australia);

WordPress – 600 posts and pages that make up my tangential travel and Jewish Life website https://elirab.me;

online classrooms which can simultaneously connect nine schools at once;

Google, including Google Search, YouTube, Translate, Maps, Earth, Hangouts, Chrome and Drive;

social media networks such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn; and

additional resources such as Wikipedia

Handout

Warsaw Handout 2

 

Warsaw KehilaLink

I am pleased to advise I have taken on the important project of creating
and running the Warsaw KehilaLink.

It is quite surprising that there has been no KehilaLink for Warsaw,
once the largest Jewish city in Europe and the second largest in the
world after New York.

JewishGen KehilaLinks (formerly “ShtetLinks”) is a project
facilitating web pages commemorating the places where Jews have lived.

Kehila  [Hebrew] n. (pl. kehilot): is used to refer to a Jewish
community, anywhere in the world.

KehilaLinks are hosted by JewishGen, the world’s largest Jewish
genealogical organisation. It has a user base of over 500,000 registered
users worldwide.

I invite you to send in your stories, memories, photos and family
biographies.

The link to the site under construction:

Warsaw 

Home

Jewish Community of Warsaw

Source: kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/warsaw/Home.html

 

IAJGS Orlando 2017

IAJGS Orlando

Orlando Jewish Info – Your Jewish Guide to Orlando Orlando Jewish Info – Your Jewish Guide to Orlando Orlando Jewish Info Guide Source: www.orlandojewishinfo.com Getting there The Swan …

Source: elirab.me/iajgs-orlando/

Back to Warsaw

Zamenhof in the streets

Zamenhof in the cemetery

Partisans with Michael Leiserowitz

Warsaw Cemetery

Jewish Cemetery, Warsaw – Wikipedia

The Warsaw Jewish Cemetery is one of the largest Jewish cemeteries in Europe and in the world. Located on Warsaw’s Okopowa Street and abutting the Powązki Cemetery at 52°14′51″N 20°58′29″E / 52.24750°N 20.97472°E / 52.24750; 20.97472, the Jewish necropolis was established in 1806 and occupies 33 hectares (83 acres) of land. The cemetery contains over 250,000 marked graves[1], as well as mass graves of victims of the Warsaw Ghetto. Many of these graves and crypts are overgrown, having been abandoned after the German invasion of Poland and subsequent Holocaust. Although the cemetery was closed down during World War II, after the war it was reopened and a small portion of it remains active, serving Warsaw’s small existing Jewish population.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_Cemetery,_Warsaw

At the JCC with Romi Rutovitz

JCC Warsaw

Jewish Community Center

Source: www.jccwarszawa.pl/?LangId=2

A quick return visit to Polin

Friends

Wojciech Konończuk with his new book. In 2011 Wojciech influenced me to visit Poland for the first time!

Michael & Ruth Leiserowitz at the German Historical Institute.

Ruth is a professor of history at Humboldt University in Berlin and Deputy Director at the German Historical Institute in Warsaw. Michael is the German and Hebrew speaking guide at Polin Museum in Warsaw.

Their Jews in East Prussia Facebook site.

​https://www.facebook.com/Jewsineastprussia/

With Jakub Petelewicz, Director of Education at Forum For Dialogue

Forum for Dialogue | Forum Dialogu

Inspiring New Connections

Source: dialog.org.pl/en/forum-for-dialogue/

Warsaw Day 2

A brilliant tour of Polin with my host Michael Leiserowitz, official guide.

POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews – Wikipedia

POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews (Polish: Muzeum Historii Żydów Polskich) is a museum on the site of the former Warsaw Ghetto. The Hebrew word Polin in the museum’s name means, in English, either “Poland” or “rest here” and is related to a legend on the arrival of the first Jews in Poland.[1] The cornerstone was laid in 2007, and the museum was first opened on April 19, 2013.[2][3] The museum’s Core Exhibition opened in October 2014.[4] The museum features a multimedia narrative exhibition about the living Jewish community that flourished in Poland for a thousand years up to the Holocaust.[5] The building, a postmodern structure in glass, copper, and concrete, was designed by Finnish architects Rainer Mahlamäki and Ilmari Lahdelma.[6]

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/POLIN_Museum_of_the_History_of_Polish_Jews

 

With Lisa & Samuel Kassow & Michael Leiserowitz

Temporary Exhibition – Jukebox, Jewkbox

Jukebox, Jewkbox! – history of popular music written on gramophone records

Newsletter

Source: www.polin.pl/en/news/2016/07/06/jukebox-jewkbox-history-of-popular-music-written-on-gramophone

The Resource Centre

Aleks and Magda

Praga – Wikipedia

Praga is a district of Warsaw, Poland. It is located on the east bank of the river Vistula. First mentioned in 1432, until 1791 it formed a separate town with its own city charter.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Praga

Praga

The streets of Warsaw

 

Professor Kassow, YIVO, Polin & Poland

Video of the opening statement in an online YIVO course run by Professor Samuel Kassow, world authority on Ashkenazi Jews.

 

Samuel Kassow

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dr. Samuel D. Kassow (born 1946) is an American historian of the history of Ashkenazi Jewry. He was born in a displaced persons‘ camp in Stuttgart, Germany. His mother survived because a classmate hid her and her sister in a dug-out underneath the barn on his family’s farm, whilst his father was arrested by the Russians and spent the duration of the war in a Soviet prison camp.[1][2] He grew up in New Haven, Connecticut.[3] Kassow earned his B.A. from Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut, in 1966, his M.Sc. from the London School of Economics in 1968, and his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1976. He is married to Lisa Kassow, director of the Zachs Hillel House at Trinity College. He has two daughters named Miri and Serena.[4] Kassow was the Charles Northam Professor at Trinity College for many years.

Kassow was a consultant to the Museum of History of the Polish Jews, which opened on the site of the Warsaw Ghetto, and was responsible for two of the eight core exhibitions. [5]

In his books, Who Will Write Our History? Rediscovering a Hidden Archive From the Warsaw Ghetto and Who Will Write Our History? Emanuel Ringelblum, the Warsaw Ghetto, and the Oyneg Shabes Archive, Kassow speaks about the importance of preserving historical documents and the past. He describes the historical events going on during World War Two in the 1940s that affected and eventually eliminated the Warsaw Ghetto. His main focus is the three archives created in absolute secrecy by a small group of people that lived in the Warsaw Ghetto which were uncovered and studied about ten years later.[6]

His 2007 book Who Will Write Our History is currently being adapted to a documentary film of the same title, directed by Roberta Grossman and produced by Nancy Spielberg. It is set to be released in 2017.

Books

  • Students, Professors, and the State inTsarist Russia: 1884-1917, University of California Press, 1989. ISBN 0-520-05760-0.
  • Between Tsar and People: the Search for a Public Identity in Tsarist Russia. Edith Clowes, Samuel Kassow, James L. West eds. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ 1991. ISBN 0-691-03153-3.
  • The Distinctive Life of East European Jewry, YIVO, New York 2004
  • Who will Write our History: Emanuel Ringelblum and the Oyneg Shabes Archive, Indiana University Press, 2007

External links

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YIVO

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
YIVO
Center for Jewish History NYC.jpg
Established 1925
Location 15 West 16th Street, ManhattanNew YorkUS
Coordinates 40.738047°N 73.993821°WCoordinates40.738047°N 73.993821°W
Director Jonathan Brent
Public transit access Subway14th Street – Union Square
Website YIVO

YIVO (Yiddishייִוואָ), established in 1925 in Wilno, Poland (now Vilnius, Lithuania) as the Yidisher Visnshaftlekher Institut (Yiddishייִדישער װיסנשאַפֿטלעכער אינסטיטוטYiddish Scientific Institute[1]), is an organization that preserves, studies, and teaches the cultural history of Jewish life throughout Eastern Europe, Germany and Russia, as well as orthographylexicography, and other studies related to the Yiddish language. (The word yidisher means both “Yiddish” and “Jewish”.) The English name of the organization was changed to the Institute for Jewish Research subsequent to its relocation to New York City, although it is still primarily known by its Yiddish acronym. YIVO is now a member of the Center for Jewish History.

Activities

YIVO preserves manuscripts, rare books, and diaries, and other Yiddish sources. The YIVO Library in New York contains over 385,000 volumes[1] dating from as early as the 16th century.[2][3] The YIVO Archives holds over 24,000,000 documents, photographs, recordings, posters, films, and other artifacts.[1] Together, they comprise the world’s largest collection of materials related to the history and culture of Central and East European Jewry and the American Jewish immigrant experience.[1] The Archives and Library collections also hold many works in twelve major languages,[4] including EnglishFrenchGermanHebrewRussianPolish, and Ladino .[4]

YIVO also functions as a publisher of Yiddish-language books and of periodicals including YIVO Bleter[5] (founded 1931), Yedies Fun YIVO (founded 1929), and Yidishe Shprakh(founded 1941). It is also responsible for such English-language publications as the YIVO Annual of Jewish Social Studies (founded 1946).

History

YIVO was initially proposed by Yiddish linguist and writer Nochum Shtif (1879–1933). He characterized his advocacy of Yiddish as “realistic” Jewishnationalism, contrasted to the “visionary” Hebraists and the “self-hating” assimilationists who adopted Russian or Polish. Other key founders included philologist and theater director Max Weinreich (1894–1969) and historian Elias Tcherikover (1881–1943).[6]

Founded at a Berlin conference in 1925, but headquartered in Wilno – a city then in Eastern Poland with a large Jewish population – the early YIVO also had branches in Berlin, Warsaw and New York City. Over the next decade, smaller groups arose in many of the other countries with Ashkenazic Jewish populations.

In YIVO’s first decades, Tcherikover headed the historical research section, which also included Shimon DubnowSaul M. GinsburgAbraham Menes, and Jacob ShatzkyLeibush Lehrer (1887–1964) headed a section including psychologists and educators Abraham GolombH. S. Kasdan, and A. A. RobackJacob Lestschinsky (1876–1966) headed a section of economists and demographers Ben-AdirLiebman Hersh, and Moshe Shalit. Weinreich’s language and literature section included Judah Leib (“J.L.”) CahanAlexander HarkavyJudah A. JoffeSelig KalmanovitchShmuel NigerNoah Prilutzky, and Zalman Reisen.[7] YIVO also collected and preserved ethnographic materials under the direction of its Ethnographic Committee.[8] In 1925, YIVO’s honorary board of trustees or “Curatorium” consisted of Simon DubnowAlbert EinsteinSigmund FreudMoses GasterEdward Sapirand Chaim Zhitlowsky.

From 1934–1940, YIVO operated a graduate training program known as the Aspirantur. Named after Zemach Shabad, YIVO’s chairman, the program held classes and guided students in conducting original research in the field of Jewish studies. Many of the students’ projects were sociological in nature (reflecting the involvement of Max Weinreich) and gathered information on contemporary Jewish life in the Vilna region.[9]

The Nazi advance into Eastern Europe caused YIVO to move its operations to New York. A second important center established as the Fundacion IWO in Buenos Aires, Argentina.[10] All four directors of YIVO’s research sections were already in the Americas when the war broke out or were able to make their way there.[11] For their own reasons, the Nazis carried the bulk of YIVO’s archives to Berlin, where the papers survived the war intact, and eventually were moved to YIVO in New York

The Chicago YIVO Society is a third active center today .[12]

Publications

YIVO has undertaken many major scholarly publication projects, the most recent being The YIVO Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe, published in March 2008 in cooperation with Yale University Press.[13] Under the leadership of editor-in-chief Gershon David Hundert, professor of history and of Jewish Studies at McGill University in Montreal, this unprecedented reference work systematically represents the history and culture of Eastern European Jews from their first settlement in the region to the present day. More than 1,800 alphabetical entries encompass a vast range of topics including religion, folklore, politics, art, music, theater, language and literature, places, organizations, intellectual movements, and important figures. The two-volume set also features more than 1,000 illustrations and 55 maps. With original contributions from an international team of 450 distinguished scholars, the encyclopedia covers the region between Germany and the Ural Mountains, from which more than 2.5 million Jews emigrated to the United States between 1870 and 1920.

The first complete English-language edition of Max Weinreich’s classic book History of the Yiddish Language,[14] edited by Dr. Paul (Hershl) Glasser, was published in two volumes in 2008.

 

Polin Museum, Warsaw, Poland

Warsaw, Poland

With Helise Lieberman
With Helise Lieberman

The Polin Museum

POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews
Muzeum Historii Żydów Polskich
Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw 011.JPG

The museum building
Established 2005 (opened April 2013)
Location Warsaw, Poland
Coordinates 52°14′58″N 20°59′34″E
Type Historical, cultural
Collection size History and culture of Polish Jews
Visitors expected 450,000
Director Dariusz Stola
Curator Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett
Website Museum official website

POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews (PolishMuzeum Historii Żydów Polskich) is a museum on the site of the former Warsaw Ghetto. The Hebrew word Polin in the museum’s name means, in English, either “Poland” or “rest here” and is related to a legend on the arrival of the first Jews in Poland.[1] The cornerstone was laid in 2007, and the museum was first opened on April 19, 2013.[2][3] The museum’s Core Exhibition opened in October 2014.[4] The museum features a multimedia narrative exhibition about the vibrant Jewish community that flourished in Poland for a thousand years up to the Holocaust.[5] The building, a postmodern structure in glass, copper, and concrete, was designed by Finnish architects Rainer Mahlamäki and Ilmari Lahdelma.[6

History

 

President of the Republic of PolandLech Kaczynski, at the groundbreaking ceremony for the POLIN Museum, 26 June 2007

The idea for creating a major new museum in Warsaw dedicated to the history of Polish Jews was initiated in 1995 by the Association of the Jewish Historical Institute of Poland.[7] In the same year, the Warsaw City Council allocated the land for this purpose in Muranów, Warsaw’s prewar Jewish neighborhood and site of the former Warsaw Ghetto, facing the Monument to the Warsaw Ghetto Heroes. In 2005, the Association of the Jewish Historical Institute of Poland established a unique private-public partnership with the Polish Ministry of Culture and National Heritage and the City of Warsaw. The Museum’s first director was Jerzy Halbersztadt. In September 2006, a specially designed tent called Ohel (the Hebrew word for tent in English) was erected for exhibitions and events on the museum’s future location.[7]

An international architectural competition for designs for the building was launched in 2005, supported by a grant from the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage. On June 30, 2005 the jury announced the winner; a team of two Finnish architects, Rainer Mahlamäki and Ilmari Lahdelma.[8] On June 30, 2009 construction of the building was officially inaugurated. The project was to be finished in 33 months at a cost of PLN 150 million zlotyallocated by the Ministry and the City.[9] and a total cost of PLN 320 million zloty.[10][11]

The museum opened the building and began its educational and cultural programs on April 19, 2013 on the 70th Anniversary of Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. During the 18 months that followed, more than 180,000 visitors toured the building, visited the first temporary exhibitions, and took part in cultural and educational programs and events, including films, debates, workshops, performances, concerts and lectures. The Grand Opening, with the completed Core Exhibition, was on October 28, 2014.[12] The Core Exhibition documents and celebrates the thousand-year history of the Jewish community in Poland that was decimated by the Holocaust.[4][5]

In 2016 the museum won the European Museum of the Year Award from the European Museum Forum.[13]

DSC_6344

The Jewish Historical Institute

Three videos from Matan Shefi, whom I bumped in the street, not far from Polin

IMG_8577

Jewish Historical Institute

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

The Jewish Historical Institute (PolishŻydowski Instytut Historyczny or ŻIH) is a research institute in WarsawPoland, primarily dealing with the history of Jews in Poland.

History

The Jewish Historical Institute was created in 1947 as a continuation of the Central Jewish Historical Commission, founded in 1944. The Jewish Historical Institute Association is the corporate body responsible for the building and the Institute’s holdings. The Institute falls under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage. In 2009 it was named after Emanuel Ringelblum. The institute is a repository of documentary materials relating to the Jewish historical presence in Poland. It is also a centre for academic research, study and the dissemination of knowledge about the history and culture of Polish Jewry.

The most valuable part of the collection is the Warsaw Ghetto Archive, known as the Ringelblum Archive (collected by the Oyneg Shabbos). It contains about 6000 documents (about 30 000 individual pieces of paper).

Other important collections concerning World War II include testimonies (mainly of Jewish survivors of the Holocaust), memoirs and diaries, documentation of the Joint and Jewish Self-Help (welfare organizations active in Poland under the occupation), and documents from the Jewish Councils (Judenräte)

The section on the documentation of Jewish historical sites holds about 40 thousand photographs concerning Jewish life and culture in Poland.

The Institute has published a series of documents from the Ringelblum Archive, as well as numerous wartime memoirs and diaries.[1]

In 2011, Paweł Śpiewak, a Professor of Sociology at Warsaw University and former politician, was nominated as the Director of the Jewish Historical Institute by Bogdan Zdrojewski, Minister of Culture and National Heritage.[2]

The Nosyk Synagogue

Nożyk Synagogue

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Nożyk Synagogue
Synagoga Nożyków
 
Basic information
Location WarsawPoland
Geographic coordinates 52°14′10″N 21°00′04″ECoordinates52°14′10″N 21°00′04″E
Affiliation Orthodox Judaism
District Śródmieście
Ecclesiastical or organizational status Active Synagogue
Leadership Rabbi Michael Schudrich
Website http://www.warszawa.jewish.org.pl
Architectural description
Architect(s) Karol Kozłowski
Architectural style neoromanesque
Completed 1902
Construction cost 250.000 rubles
Specifications
Capacity 600
 

Interior of the synagogue

The Nożyk Synagogue (PolishSynagoga Nożyków) is the only surviving prewar Jewish house of prayer in Warsaw, Poland. It was built in 1898-1902 and was restored after World War II. It is still operational and currently houses the Warsaw Jewish Commune, as well as other Jewish organizations.

History

Before World War II the Jewish community of Warsaw, one of the largest Jewish communities in the world at that time, had over 400 houses of prayer at its disposal. However, at the end of 19th century only two of them were separate structures, while the rest were smaller chapels attached to schools, hospitals or private homes. The earliest Round Synagogue in the borough of Praga served the local community since 1839, while the Great Synagogue (erected in 1878) was built for the reformed community. Soon afterwards a need arose to build a temple also for the orthodox Jewry. Between 1898 and 1902 Zalman Nożyk, a renowned Warsaw merchant, and his wife Ryfka financed such temple at Twarda street, next to the neighbourhood of Grzybów and Plac Grzybowski. The building was designed by a famous Warsaw architect, Karol Kozłowski, author of the Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra Hall.[1] The façade is neo-romanticist, with notable neo-Byzantine elements. The building itself is rectangular, with the internal chamber divided into three aisles.

The synagogue was officially opened to the public on May 26, 1902. In 1914 the founders donated it to the Warsaw Jewish Commune, in exchange for yearly prayers in their intention. In 1923 the building was refurbished by Maurycy Grodzieński, who also designed a semi-circular choir that was attached to the eastern wall of the temple. In September 1939 the synagogue was damaged during an air raid. During World War II the area was part of the Small Ghetto and shared its fate during the Ghetto Uprising and then the liquidation of the Jewish community of Warsaw by the Nazis. After 1941 the Germans used the building as stables and a depot. After the war the demolished building was partially restored and returned to the Warsaw Jewish Commune, but the reconstruction did not start. It was completely rebuilt between 1977 and 1983 (officially opened April 18, 1983). It was also then that a new wing was added to the eastern wall, currently housing the seat of the commune, as well as several other Jewish organizations.

Ghetto Wall Marking

DSC_9324

DSC_9325

Meetings

 

 

FODZ
FODZ

Forum-dialog

Chopin and Kopernicus

The Storm

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (PolishGrób Nieznanego Żołnierza) is a monument in WarsawPoland, dedicated to the unknown soldiers who have given their lives for Poland. It is one of many such national tombs of unknowns that were erected after World War I, and the most important such monument in Poland.[1]

The monument, located at Piłsudski Square, is the only surviving part of the Saxon Palace that occupied the spot until World War II. Since 2 November 1925 the tomb houses an unidentified body of a young soldier who fell during the Defence of Lwów. At a later date earth from numerous battlefields where Polish soldiers have fought was added to the urns housed in the surviving pillars of the Saxon Palace.

The Tomb is constantly lit by an eternal flame and assisted by a guard post by the Representative Battalion of the Polish Army. It is there that most official military commemorations take place in Poland and where foreign representatives lay wreaths when visiting Poland.

The changing of the guard takes place on the hour of every hour daily and this happens 365 days a year.

History

In 1923, a group of unknown Varsovians placed, before Warsaw’s Saxon Palace and the adjacent Saxon Garden, a stone tablet commemorating all the unknown Polish soldiers who had fallen in World War I and the subsequent Polish-Soviet War. This initiative was taken up by several Warsaw newspapers and by General Władysław Sikorski. On April 4, 1925, the Polish Ministry of War selected a battlefield from which the ashes of an unknown soldier would be brought to Warsaw. Of some 40 battles, that for Lwów was chosen. In October 1925, at Lwów’s Cemetery of the Defenders of Lwów, three coffins were exhumed: those of an unknown sergeant, corporal and private. The coffin that was to be transported to Warsaw was chosen by Jadwiga Zarugiewiczowa, mother of a soldier who had fallen at Zadwórze and whose body had never been found.

On November 2, 1925, the coffin was brought to Warsaw’s St. John’s Cathedral, where a Mass was held. Afterward eight recipients of the order of Virtuti Militari bore the coffin to its final resting place beneath the colonnade joining the two wings of the Saxon Palace. The coffin was buried along with 14 urns containing soil from as many battlegrounds, a Virtuti Militari medal, and a memorial tablet. Since then, except under German occupation during World War II, an honor guard has continuously been held before the Tomb.

Architecture

The Tomb was designed by the famous Polish sculptor, Stanisław Kazimierz Ostrowski. It was located within the arcade that linked the two symmetric wings of the Saxon Palace, then the seat of the Polish Ministry of War. The central tablet was ringed by 5 eternal flames and 4 stone tablets bearing the names and dates of battles in which Polish soldiers had fought during World War I and the Polish–Soviet War (1919–21). Behind the Tomb were two steel gratings bearing emblems of Poland’s two highest Polish military decorations — the Virtuti Militari and Cross of Valor.

During the 1939 invasion of Poland, the building was slightly damaged by German aerial bombing, but it was quickly rebuilt and seized by the German authorities. After the Warsaw Uprising, in December 1944, the palace was completely demolished by the Wehrmacht. Only part of the central colonnade, sheltering the Tomb, was preserved.

After the war, in late 1945, reconstruction began. Only a small part of the palace, containing the Tomb, was restored by Henryk Grunwald. On 8 May 1946 it was opened to the public. Soil from 24 additional battlegrounds was added to the urns, as well as more tablets with names of battles in which Poles had fought in World War II. However, the communist authorities erased all trace of the Polish–Soviet War of 1920, and only a few of the Polish Armed Forces’ battles in the West were included. This was corrected in 1990, after Poland had regained its political autonomy.

There are plans to rebuild the Saxon Palace, but as of May 2016, these plans have been indefinitely on hold due to a lack of budget.[citation needed]

The Hotel Bristol

Hotel Bristol, Warsaw

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Hotel Bristol, Warsaw
Hotel Bristol 2011.JPG

Hotel Bristol, Warsaw (2011)
General information
Location WarsawPoland
Address Krakowskie Przedmiescie 42/44
Opening November 19, 1901
Owner Towarzystwo Akcyjne Budowy i Prowadzenia Hotelów, (1901-1928),
Bank Cukrownictwa (1928-1948),
City of Warsaw (1947-1952),
Orbis (1952-1977),
University of Warsaw (1977-1981),
Orbis (1981-2011),
Rosmarinum Investments (2011-)
Management Starwood Hotels
Design and construction
Architect Władysław Marconi
Other information
Number of rooms 168
Number of suites 38
Website
www.hotelbristolwarsaw.pl

Hotel Bristol, Warsaw is a historic luxury hotel opened in 1901 located on Krakowskie Przedmieście in Poland‘s capital, Warsaw

History

 

Hotel Bristol in 1901

The Hotel Bristol was constructed from 1899-1900 on the site of the Tarnowski Palace by a company whose partners included Polish pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski. A competition was held for the design of the building, and architects Thaddeus Stryjeriski and Franciszek Mączyński won with their Art Nouveau design. However the builders decided to change the style to a Neo-Renaissance design, and brought in architect Władysław Marconi to design the final hotel. Some of its interiors were designed by the noted Viennese architect Otto Wagner. The cornerstone was laid on April 22, 1899 and the hotel was dedicated on November 17, 1901 and opened on November 19, 1901.

 

Elegant cafe in the Bristol designed by Otto Wagner, 1901

After Poland gained its independence in 1919, Paderewski became the Prime Minister and held the first session of his government at his hotel. Paderewski and his partners sold their shares in the hotel in 1928 to a local bank, which renovated the hotel in 1934 with modern interiors by designer Antoni Jawornicki.

Upon the German invasion in 1939, the hotel was made into the headquarters of the Chief of the Warsaw District. It miraculously survived the war relatively unscathed, standing nearly alone among the rubble of its neighborhood. Following the war, the hotel was renovated and reopened in 1945.

 

Hotel lobby

The City of Warsaw took over operation of the hotel in 1947 and it was nationalized in 1948 and joined the state-run Orbis chain in 1952, exclusively serving visitors from abroad. By the 1970s its outdated facilities had seen it demoted to a second class ranking by the government and the hotel was donated by Prime Minister Peter Jaroszewicz to the University of Warsaw in 1977 to eventually serve as their library. It closed in 1981. However no work was done and the building languished through the waning days of the Communist government.

After the fall of Communism in 1989, the hotel was finally completely restored it to its former glory from 1991-1993, with the original interiors of the public rooms recreated to match the 1901 designs. The Bristol was reopened on April 17, 1993, with Margaret Thatcherin attendance, as part of the British Forte Hotels chain. From 1998 to 2013, the hotel was part of the Le Méridien hotel chain. The exterior was further restored in 2005, and the interior redecorated in 2013, after which the hotel joined The Luxury Collection division of Starwood Hotels.

Warsaw Uprising Youth Monument

Mały Powstaniec

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
The Little Insurgent
Mały Powstaniec
Pomnik Malego Powstanca.JPG
Coordinates 52°14′59″N 21°0′34″ECoordinates52°14′59″N 21°0′34″E
Location Warsaw Old TownWarsawPoland
Designer Jerzy Jarnuszkiewicz
Material Bronze sculpture
Completion date 1 October 1983
Dedicated to The child soldiers of the Warsaw Uprising

Mały Powstaniec (the “Little Insurgent”) is a statue in commemoration of the child soldiers who fought and died during the Warsaw Uprising of 1944. It is located on Podwale Street, next to the ramparts of Warsaw’s Old Town.

The statue is of a young boy wearing a helmet too large for his head and holding a submachine gun. It is reputed to be of a fighter who went by the pseudonym of “Antek”, and was killed on 8 August 1944 at the age of 13. The helmet and submachine gun are stylized after German equipment, which was captured during the uprising and used by the resistance fighters against the occupying forces.

Jerzy Jarnuszkiewicz[1] created the design for the monument in 1946, which was later used to make smaller copies of its present state. The statue was unveiled on October 1, 1983 by Professor Jerzy Świderski – a cardiologist who was a courier for the resistance during the uprising (pseudonym: “Lubicz”) serving in the Gustaw regiment of the Armia Krajowa. Behind the statue is a plaque with the engraved words of “Warszawskie Dzieci” (“Warsaw Children”), a popular song from the period: “Warszawskie dzieci, pójdziemy w bój – za każdy kamień twój, stolico damy krew” (“We’re the children of Warsaw, going into battle – for every stone of yours, we will give our blood”).

More Warsaw

Warsaw at night

Jewish Education In Vilnius

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http://judaicvilnius.com

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SOLOMO ALEICHEMO ORT SCHOOL in Vilnius
http://www.jewishschool.lt

From Wikipedia
Vilnius Sholom Aleichem ORT gymnasium – full-time secondary school in Vilnius, IT Kraševskio g. 5 engaged in primary, secondary and non-formal education programs in Hebrew, Lithuanian, Russian. Named after writer Sholom Aleichem.
Vilniaus Šolomo Aleichemo ORT gimnazija – dieninė bendrojo lavinimo mokykla Vilniuje, J. I. Kraševskio g. 5, vykdanti pradinio, pagrindinio, vidurinio ir neformaliojo ugdymo programas hebrajų kalba, lietuvių, rusų kalbomis. Pavadinta rašytojo Šolomo Aleichemo vardu.

I met with the Director Misha Jakobas, who kindly showed me around the new campus and its impressive facilities. The students appeared to be very well behaved and there was a lovely atmosphere in the building, which they moved into only 3 months ago.
Parents attended the year end concerts, including my friend, Daniel Gurevich. We were quite surprised to bump into each other!

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On a related, but somewhat tangential subject:
Roman Vishniac Exhibition at Polin in Warsaw, Poland
Which includes a segment on ORT. Runs until 31 August 2015.
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/…/4632,roman-vishniac-at-polin-mu…/
JewishGen.org's photo.
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From Wikipedia
Roman Vishniac (/ˈvɪʃni.æk/; Russian: Рома́н Соломо́нович Вишня́к; August 19, 1897 – January 22, 1990) was a Russian-American photographer, best known for capturing on film the culture of Jews in Central and Eastern Europe before the Holocaust

Vishniac was a versatile photographer, an accomplished biologist, an art collector and teacher of art history. He also made significant scientific contributions to photomicroscopy and time-lapse photography. Vishniac was very interested in history, especially that of his ancestors, and strongly attached to his Jewish roots; he was a Zionist later in life.[3]

Roman Vishniac won international acclaim for his photos of shtetlach and Jewish ghettos, celebrity portraits, and microscopic biology. His book A Vanished World, published in 1983, made him famous and is one of the most detailed pictorial documentations of Jewish culture in Eastern Europe in the 1930s.[2] Vishniac was also remembered for his humanism and respect for life, sentiments that can be seen in all aspects of his work.

In August 2014, the International Center for Photography in New York City announced that 9,000 of Vishniac’s photos, many never printed or published before, would be posted in an online database.[4]

[contact-form][contact-field label=’Name’ type=’name’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Email’ type=’email’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Website’ type=’url’/][contact-field label=’Comment’ type=’textarea’ required=’1’/][/contact-form]

Polin Museum, Warsaw, Poland

Sunday 17  May 2015

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I arrived from London this morning and headed straight for the Polin Museum. I have visited the museum twice before in 2013 and 2014, but this is the first time since it officially opened in October 2014.

The selection of my images here indicates how remarkable and magnificent this museum is. I have visited many museums around the world over many years, and Polin is one of the best!

I took over 700 photos this afternoon, spent 5½ hours at the Core Exhibition and could have been there a few more hours! It is a “must visit” for anyone coming to Warsaw, Jewish or not!

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The Resource Centre

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Magdalena

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Marzena

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Closing time

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Mila 18

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Video

POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews
Muzeum Historii Żydów Polskich
Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw 011.JPG

The museum building
Established 2005 (opened April 2013)
Location Warsaw, Poland
Coordinates 52°14′58″N 20°59′34″E
Type Historical, cultural
Collection size History and culture of Polish Jews
Visitors expected 450,000
Director Dariusz Stola
Curator Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett
Website Museum official website

POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews (PolishMuzeum Historii Żydów Polskich) is a museum on the site of the former Warsaw Ghetto. The Hebrew word Polin in the museum’s name means, in English, either “Poland” or “rest here” and is related to a legend on the arrival of the first Jews in Poland.[1] The cornerstone was laid in 2007, and the museum was first opened on April 19, 2013.[2][3] The museum’s Core Exhibition opened in October 2014.[4] The museum features a multimedia narrative exhibition about the vibrant Jewish community that flourished in Poland for a thousand years up to the Holocaust.[5] The building, a postmodern structure in glass, copper, and concrete, was designed by Finnish architects Rainer Mahlamäki and Ilmari Lahdelma.[6]

History

President of the Republic of PolandLech Kaczynski, at the groundbreaking ceremony for the POLIN Museum, 26 June 2007

The idea for creating a major new museum in Warsaw dedicated to the history of Polish Jews was initiated in 1995 by the Association of the Jewish Historical Institute of Poland.[7] In the same year, the Warsaw City Council allocated the land for this purpose in Muranów, Warsaw’s prewar Jewish neighborhood and site of the former Warsaw Ghetto, facing the Monument to the Warsaw Ghetto Heroes. In 2005, the Association of the Jewish Historical Institute of Poland established a unique private-public partnership with the Polish Ministry of Culture and National Heritage and the City of Warsaw. The Museum’s first director was Jerzy Halbersztadt. In September 2006, a specially designed tent called Ohel (the Hebrew word for tent in English) was erected for exhibitions and events on the museum’s future location.[7]

An international architectural competition for designs for the building was launched in 2005, supported by a grant from the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage. On June 30, 2005 the jury announced the winner; a team of two Finnish architects, Rainer Mahlamäki and Ilmari Lahdelma.[8] On June 30, 2009 construction of the building was officially inaugurated. The project was to be finished in 33 months at a cost of PLN 150 million zlotyallocated by the Ministry and the City.[9] and a total cost of PLN 320 million zloty.[10][11]

The Museum opened the building and began its educational and cultural programs on April 19, 2013 on the 70th Anniversary of Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. During the 18 months that followed, more than 180,000 visitors toured the building, visited the first temporary exhibitions, and took part in cultural and educational programs and events, including films, debates, workshops, performances, concerts and lectures. The Grand Opening, with the completed Core Exhibition, was on October 28, 2014.[12] The Core Exhibition documents and celebrates the thousand-year history of the Jewish community in Poland that was decimated by the Holocaust.[4][5]

Construction

Museum faces the Memorial to the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising

The Museum faces the memorial commemorating the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising of 1943. The winner of the architectural competition was Rainer Mahlamäki, of the architectural studio ‘Lahdelma & Mahlamäki Oy in Helsinki, whose design was chosen from 100 submissions to the international architectural competition. The Polish firm Kuryłowicz & Associates was responsible for construction. The building’s minimalist exterior is clad with glass fins and copper mesh. Silk screened on the glass is the word Polin, in Latin and Hebrew letters.

The central feature of the building is its cavernous entrance hall. The main hall forms a high, undulating wall. The empty space is a symbol of cracks in the history of Polish Jews. Similar in shape to gorge, which could be a reference to the crossing of the Red Sea known from the Exodus. The museum is nearly 13,000 square meters of usable space. At the lowest level, in the basement of the building will be placed a main exhibition about history of Jews from the Middle Ages to modern times. The museum building also has a multipurpose auditorium with 480 seats, temporary exhibition rooms, education center, information center, play room for children, café, shop, and in the future kosher restaurant.

Hebrew and Latin letters of the word Polin

Since the museum presents the whole history of Jews in Poland, not only the period under German occupation, the designer wanted to avoid similarities to existing Holocaust museums (such as the Jewish Museum in Berlin and the museum at Yad Vashem) which had austere concrete structures. The architects kept the museum in the colors of sand, giving it a more approachable feeling.[13]

In 2008, the design of the museum was awarded the Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award.[14] In 2014, the designer Rainer Mahlamäki was awarded the Finlandia Prize for Architecture for his design of the museum.[15]

Organizational structure

The Core Exhibition’s academic team consists of Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett (Program Director) of New York University, Hanna Zaremska of the Institute of History of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Adam Teller of Brown University, Igor Kąkolewski of the University of Warmia and Mazury, Marcin Wodziński of the University of WrocławSamuel Kassow of Trinity College, Barbara Engelking and Jacek Leociak of the Polish Center for Holocaust Research at the Polish Academy of Sciences, Helena Datner of the Jewish Historical Institute, and Stanisław Krajewski of Warsaw UniversityAntony Polonsky of Brandeis University is the Core Exhibition’s chief historian.[16]

Main hall

The North American Council of the Museum of the History of Polish Jews is a U.S. based non-profit organization supporting the foundation of the Museum.[17]

On June 17, 2009 the museum launched the Virtual Shtetl portal, which collects and provides access to essential information about Jewish life in Poland before and after the Holocaust in Poland. The portal now features more than 1,240 towns with maps, statistics, and image galleries based in large measure on material provided by local history enthusiasts and former residents of those places.[18]

Core Exhibition

The Core Exhibition occupies more than 4,000 m2 of space. It consists of eight galleries that document and celebrate the thousand-year history of the Jewish community in Poland – once the largest Jewish community in the world – that was almost entirely destroyed during the Holocaust. The exhibition includes a multimedia narrative with interactive installations, paintings and oral histories, among other features created by more than 120 scholars and curators. One item is a replica of the roof and ceiling of a 17th-century Gwoździec synagogue.[5][19] The galleries are:

  • Forest – This gallery tells the tale of how, fleeing from persecution in Western Europe, the Jews came to Poland. For the next 1,000 years, the country would become the largest European home for the Jewish community.
  • First Encounters (the Middle Ages) – This gallery is devoted to the first Jewish settlers in Poland. Visitors meet Ibrahim ibn Jakub, a Jewish diplomat from Cordoba, author of famous notes from a trip to Europe. One of the most interesting objects presented in the gallery is the first sentence written in Yiddish in the prayer book of 1272.

Gwoździec synagogue roof reconstruction

Reconstructed vault and bimah in the Museum of the History of Polish Jews

  • Paradisus Iudaeorum (15th and 16th centuries) – This gallery presents how the Jewish community was organized and what role Jews played in the country’s economy. One of the most important elements in this gallery is an interactive model of Kraków and Jewish Kazimierz, showing the rich culture of the local Jewish community. Visitors learn that religious tolerance in Poland made it a “Paradisus ludaeorum” (Jewish paradise). This golden age of the Jewish community in Poland ended with pogroms during the Khmelnitsky Uprising. This event is commemorated by a symbolic fire gall leading to the next gallery.
  • The Jewish Town (17th and 18th centuries) – This gallery presents the history of Polish Jews until the period of the partitions. It is shown by an example of a typical borderland town where Jews constituted a significant part of the population. The most important part of this gallery is a unique reconstruction of the roof and ceiling of Gwoździec, a wooden synagogue that was located in the Ukraine.

“On the Jewish Street” gallery with entrances to exhibition halls

  • Encounters with Modernity (19th century) – This gallery presents the time of the partitions when Jews shared the fate of Polish society divided between Austria, Prussia and Russia. The exhibition includes the role played by Jewish entrepreneurs, such as Izrael Kalmanowicz Poznański, in the industrial revolution in Polish lands. Visitors also learn about changes in traditional Jewish rituals and other areas of life, and the emergence of new social movements, religious and political. This period is also marked by the emergence of modern anti-semitism, which Polish Jews had to face.
  • On the Jewish Street – This gallery is devoted to the period of the Second Polish Republic, which is seen – despite the challenges that the young country had to face – as a second golden age in the history of Polish Jews. A graphical timeline is presented with the most important political events of the interwar period. The exhibition also highlights Jewish film, theatre and literature.
  • Holocaust – This gallery shows the tragedy of the Holocaust during the German occupation of Poland, which resulted in the deaths of approximately 90% of the 3.3 million Polish Jews. Visitors are shown the history of the Warsaw Ghetto and introduced to Emanuel Ringelblum and Oneg Shabbat. The gallery also covers the horrors experienced by the non-Jewish majority population of Poland during World War II as well as their reactions and responses to the extermination of Jews.
  • Postwar Years – The last gallery shows the period after 1945, when most of the survivors of the Holocaust emigrated, mostly because of the post-war takeover of Poland by the Soviets and the state sponsored anti-Semitic campaign in 1968 conducted by the communist authorities. An important date is the year 1989, marking the end of Soviet domination, followed by the revival of a small but dynamic Jewish community in Poland.

The exhibition was developed by an international team of scholars and museum professionals from Poland, the United States and Israel as well as the Museum’s curatorial team under the direction of Prof. Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett.[19]

See also

Notes and references

  1. Jump up ^ “A 1000-Year History of Polish Jews” (PDF). POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews. Retrieved 2013-07-20.
  2. Jump up ^ “Kolejna budowa spóźniona. Czy jakaś powstanie na czas?”Gazeta Wyborcza. April 2012.
  3. Jump up ^ “Little Left of Warsaw Ghetto 70 Years After Uprising”Yahoo!7. April 17, 2013.
  4. Jump up to: a b “About the Museum”, POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews, accessed December 18, 2014
  5. Jump up to: a b c The Associated Press (June 24, 2007), Poland’s new Jewish museum to mark community’s thousand-year history.
  6. Jump up ^ Polish, Jewish leaders break ground on landmark Jewish museum The Associated Press, June 26, 2007
  7. Jump up to: a b A.J. Goldmann, “Polish Museum Set To Open Spectacular Window on Jewish Past” The Jewish Daily Forward, April 01, 2013.
  8. Jump up ^ “Konkurs na projekt” [Contest for the design of the Museum]. Stołeczny Zarząd Rozbudowy Miasta.
  9. Jump up ^ The Association for the Jewish Historical Institute of Poland took responsibility for creating the Core Exhibition and raising the funds for it at a cost of about PLN 120 million zlotyRozpoczęto budowę Muzeum Historii Żydów Polskich. Mkidn.gov.pl.
  10. Jump up ^ http://www.sejm.gov.pl/Sejm7.nsf/biuletyn.xsp?skrnr=KSP-96
  11. Jump up ^ http://www.mkidn.gov.pl/media/docs/2013/20130416_mzhp.pdf
  12. Jump up ^ Znamy datę otwarcia wystawy Muzeum Historii Żydów Polskich 22 January 2014
  13. Jump up ^ Museum of the History of Polish Jews by Lahdelma & Mahlamäki Dezeen Magazine, 3 October 2013.
  14. Jump up ^ International Architecture Awards: 2008 Winners The Chicago Athenaeum.
  15. Jump up ^ “Arkkitehtuurin ensimmäinen Finlandia-palkinto: Rainer Mahlamäen puolanjuutalaisen historian museo Varsovassa”. Helsingin Sanomat. 4 Nov 2014. Retrieved 5 Nov 2014.
  16. Jump up ^ Museum of the History of Polish Jews: About the museum at JewishMuseum.org.
  17. Jump up ^ The North American Council of the Museum of the History of Polish Jews.
  18. Jump up ^ “The Virtual Shtetl”
  19. Jump up to: a b “Core Exhibition”, POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews, accessed December 18, 2014