Workshop at the Holocaust & Genocide Centre

On 15 February I gave a couple of workshops at the Johannesburg Holocaust and Genocide Centre.

One session was for survivors and the other for staff and members.

(L-R). Eli Rabinowitz & Don Krausz

This was the first time I had presented specifically to a group of survivors, although I had filmed several survivors’ testimonies in the past.

I showed photos from my trips to the Baltics & Eastern Europe as well as some videos from my Zog Nit Keynmol project for King David & Herzlia Schools.

The most noticeable outcome was the positive reaction to my initiative to get our youth learning and singing Zog Nit Keynmol, the Partisan Song.

(L-R). Eli, Veronica Phillips, Barbara Berman

For more details on Zog Nit Keynmol, please visit:

http://elirab.me

The two key videos to watch are:

the Phillip Maisel Interview

Herzlia’s Vocal Ensemble Sings:

Below is a video of Freidi Mrocki reciting the poem in English. Freidi is the teacher at Sholem Aleichem College in Melbourne, who recorded the interview with Phillip Maisel in 2015.

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(L-R). Shirley Sapire, Betty Slowatek, Eli, Margaret Hoffman

Slideshow:

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Malat – 29 August 2016

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Times Of Israel report on the Malat Event

Molėtai

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Molėtai
City
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Coat of arms of Molėtai
Coat of arms
Coordinates: 55°14′N 25°25′ECoordinates55°14′N 25°25′E
Country  Lithuania
Ethnographic region Aukštaitija
County Utena County COA.pngUtena County
Municipality Molėtai district municipality
Capital of Molėtai district municipality
First mentioned 1387 Feb. 17[1]
Granted city rights 1539
Population (2013)
 • Total 6,302
Time zone EET (UTC+2)
 • Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3)
Website http://www.moletai.lt/

Molėtai (About this sound pronunciation PolishMalaty) is a town in north eastern Lithuania. One of the oldest settlements in Lithuania, it is a popular resort for the inhabitants of Vilnius. According to the 2013 census, it had 6,302 inhabitants.

The town is located about 60 km (37 mi) north of Vilnius and 30 km (19 mi) south of Utena.

History

It was first mentioned as a private property of the bishop of Vilnius.

On August 29, 1941, 700 to 1,200 Jews were murdered in a mass execution perpetrated by an Einsatzgruppen of Lithuanian nationalists.[2]

In modern times the city has Molėtai Astronomical Observatory, the only such facility in Lithuania. And Lithuanian Museum of Ethnocosmology – the first such type of museum in the world.

 

My Visit To US Holocaust Memorial Museum

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This was my first visit to the USHMM. My last visit to Washington DC was before the museum opened in 1980.

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Map of United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum 

Museum in Washington, D.C., United States of America
The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum is the United States’ official memorial to the Holocaust. Adjacent to the National Mall in Washington, D.C., the USHMM provides for the documentation, study, and interpretation of Holocaust history. Wikipedia
Address100 Raoul Wallenberg Pl SW, Washington, DC 20024, United States

 

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My photos:

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The Permanent Exhibition:

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Photos from Ejszyski, a Litvak shtetl

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Ghettos

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Three Minutes in Poland by Glenn Kurtz

A remarkable story which takes place in Nasielsk, Poland in 1938. Nasielsk is where my wife’s Reitstein / Rotsztejn family come from.

The original film is at the Steven Spielberg Film and Video Archive at USHMM

https://www.ushmm.org/online/film/display/detail.php?file_num=5216

Visit the Nasielsk KehilaLink:

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/nasielsk

The Wiener Library, London

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Wiener-Library-Google

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Wiener Library

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide is the world’s oldest institution devoted to the study of the Holocaust, its causes and legacies. Founded in 1933 as an information bureau that informed Jewish communities and governments worldwide about the persecution of the Jews under the Nazis, it was transformed into a research institute and public access library after the end of World War II. The official name of the institution is “The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide”[1] and is now situated in Russell SquareLondon.[2]

History

Alfred Wiener, a German Jew who worked for the Centralverein deutscher Staatsbürger jüdischen Glaubens (Central Association of German Citizens of Jewish Faith), a Jewish civil rights group, spent years documenting the rise of antisemitism. He collected books, photographs, letters, magazines and other materials, including school primers and children’s games,[3] recording the spread of Nazi propaganda and its racist doctrines.[4]

In 1933, Wiener fled Germany for Amsterdam and then settled in Britain. The collection opened in London on 1 September 1939, the day of the Nazi invasion of Poland. It was known as the Jewish Central Information Office and functioned as a private intelligence service. Wiener was paid by the British government to keep Britain informed of developments in Germany.[5]

After the end of World War II, the library used its extensive collections on National Socialism and the Third Reich to provide material to the United Nations War Crimes Commission and bringing war criminals to justice.

The Library’s most successful publishing venture was the production of a bi-monthly bulletin commencing in November 1946 (and which continued until 1983). Another important task during the 1950s and 1960s was the gathering of eyewitness accounts, a resource that was to become a unique and important part of the Library’s collection. The accounts were collected systematically by a team of interviewers. In 1964, the Institute of Contemporary History was established and took up the neglected field of modern European history within The Wiener Library.

During a funding crisis in 1974 it was decided to move a part of the collection to Tel Aviv. In the course of the preparations for this move, a large part of the collections was microfilmed for conservation purposes. The plans to move the library were abandoned in 1980 after the transports had already begun, resulting in a separate Wiener Library within the library of the University of Tel Aviv that consisted of the majority of the book stock, while The Wiener Library in London retained the microfilmed copies.

Today The Wiener Library is a research library dedicated to studying the Holocaust, comparative genocide studies, Nazi Germany, and German Jewry, and documenting Antisemitism and Neonazism. It is a registered charity under English law.[6]

The Fraenkel Prize

The Library also hosts The Fraenkel Prize. This prize, sponsored by Ernst Fraenkel (former Chairman and one of the Library’s Presidents) is for “outstanding work of twentieth-century history in one of The Wiener Library’s fields of interest”. These areas of interest include the following: “The History of Europe, Jewish History, The Two World Wars, Antisemitism, Comparative Genocide, Political Extremism”.[7]

See also

References

Further reading

External links

Coordinates51°31′21″N 0°08′42″W

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