Vilnius 18

Google Escort into Vilnius!
The Choral Synagogue

With the cantor  – Shmuel

Choral Synagogue, Vilnius – Wikipedia

Choral Synagogue, Vilnius – Wikipedia

The Choral Synagogue of Vilnius (Lithuanian: Vilniaus choralinė sinagoga) is the only synagogue in Vilnius that is still in use. The other synagogues were destroyed partly during World War II, when Lithuania was occupied by Nazi Germany, and partly by the Soviet authorities after the war.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choral_Synagogue,_Vilnius

Žilvinas Beliauskas

Member Spotlight with Žilvinas Beliauskas

Source: jewishlibraries.org/blog/id/391

Vilniaus žydų viešoji biblioteka

Vilniaus žydų viešoji biblioteka

Vilniaus žydų viešoji biblioteka – vienintelė Žydų kultūros sklaidoje besispecializuojanti biblioteka visoje Lietuvoje.Our library is the only one in Lithuania which specifies in spreading Jewish culture in various forms

Source: vilnius-jewish-public-library.com/en/

With Carol Hoffman & Sandra Petrukonyte 

Homepage – The Lost Shtetl

Homepage – The Lost Shtetl

Dingęs štetlas | The Lost shtetl    

Source: lostshtetl.com

Milda Jakulyte & Sandra Petrukonyte 

The Great Synagogue & Shulhof excavations

Vilnius Yiddish Institute – The first Yiddish center of higher learning to be established in post-Holocaust Eastern Europe.

Vilnius Yiddish Institute – The first Yiddish center of higher learning to be established in post-Holocaust Eastern Europe.

APPLICATION FOR YIDDISH SUMMER PROGRAM

Source: judaicvilnius.com

Vilnius University

Leyzer Ran’s book – Jerusalem of Lithuania 

The Jerusalem of Lithuania: The Story of the Jewish Community of Vilna

The Jerusalem of Lithuania: The Story of the Jewish Community of Vilna

On the eve of the Shoah the Jewish community of Vilna was the spiritual centre of Eastern European Jewry, the centre of enlightenment and Jewish political life, of Jewish creativity and the experience of daily Jewish life, a community bursting with cultural and religious life, movements and parties, educational institutions, libraries and theatres; a community of rabbis and gifted Talmudic scholars, intellectuals, poets, authors, artists, craftspeople and educators. In the Jewish world it was known as “The Jerusalem of Lithuania” – a spiritual centre of the first order.

Source: www.yadvashem.org/yv/en/exhibitions/vilna/overview.asp

With Ruta Puisyte

Video

Stolpersteine in Vilnius

The National Library & Lara Lempert
Focus on Judaic Documentary Heritage at the National Library on the Last Day of the Israeli Prime Minister’s Visit to Lithuania – Martynas Mažvydas National Library of Lithuania

Focus on Judaic Documentary Heritage at the National Library on the Last Day of the Israeli Prime Minister’s Visit to Lithuania – Martynas Mažvydas National Library of Lithuania

Nacionalinė kultūros įstaiga, kaupianti, organizuojanti ir sauganti rašytinį Lietuvos kultūros paveldą, formuojanti Lietuvos mokslui, švietimui, kultūrai ir ūkiui aktualių Lietuvos ir užsienio dokumentų fondą bei teikianti bibliotekinio informacinio aprūpinimo paslaugas visuomenei.

Source: www.lnb.lt/en/news/3400-focus-on-judaic-documentary-heritage-at-the-national-library-on-the-last-day-of-the-israeli-prime-minister-s-visit-to-lithuania

Lukiškės_Square

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lukiškės_Square

With Bella Swartzberg, Marlene & Robbie Baskin at the Artagonist Hotel
With teacher, Simonas Jurktaitis 

Friday 3 August 18

Trakai

At the Choral Synagogue before the service
Outside the Conti Hotel, Vilnius

 

 

Jewish Education In Vilnius

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http://judaicvilnius.com

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SOLOMO ALEICHEMO ORT SCHOOL in Vilnius
http://www.jewishschool.lt

From Wikipedia
Vilnius Sholom Aleichem ORT gymnasium – full-time secondary school in Vilnius, IT Kraševskio g. 5 engaged in primary, secondary and non-formal education programs in Hebrew, Lithuanian, Russian. Named after writer Sholom Aleichem.
Vilniaus Šolomo Aleichemo ORT gimnazija – dieninė bendrojo lavinimo mokykla Vilniuje, J. I. Kraševskio g. 5, vykdanti pradinio, pagrindinio, vidurinio ir neformaliojo ugdymo programas hebrajų kalba, lietuvių, rusų kalbomis. Pavadinta rašytojo Šolomo Aleichemo vardu.

I met with the Director Misha Jakobas, who kindly showed me around the new campus and its impressive facilities. The students appeared to be very well behaved and there was a lovely atmosphere in the building, which they moved into only 3 months ago.
Parents attended the year end concerts, including my friend, Daniel Gurevich. We were quite surprised to bump into each other!

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On a related, but somewhat tangential subject:
Roman Vishniac Exhibition at Polin in Warsaw, Poland
Which includes a segment on ORT. Runs until 31 August 2015.
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/…/4632,roman-vishniac-at-polin-mu…/
JewishGen.org's photo.
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From Wikipedia
Roman Vishniac (/ˈvɪʃni.æk/; Russian: Рома́н Соломо́нович Вишня́к; August 19, 1897 – January 22, 1990) was a Russian-American photographer, best known for capturing on film the culture of Jews in Central and Eastern Europe before the Holocaust

Vishniac was a versatile photographer, an accomplished biologist, an art collector and teacher of art history. He also made significant scientific contributions to photomicroscopy and time-lapse photography. Vishniac was very interested in history, especially that of his ancestors, and strongly attached to his Jewish roots; he was a Zionist later in life.[3]

Roman Vishniac won international acclaim for his photos of shtetlach and Jewish ghettos, celebrity portraits, and microscopic biology. His book A Vanished World, published in 1983, made him famous and is one of the most detailed pictorial documentations of Jewish culture in Eastern Europe in the 1930s.[2] Vishniac was also remembered for his humanism and respect for life, sentiments that can be seen in all aspects of his work.

In August 2014, the International Center for Photography in New York City announced that 9,000 of Vishniac’s photos, many never printed or published before, would be posted in an online database.[4]

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