Moshe Fiszman

 I never met Moshe Fiszman, but I have watched and studied a 9 minute video of Moshe and Uncle Boydie, produced by Viv Parry, which has greatly influenced me. This film will serve as an introduction to an inspiring global project being launched in Australia in August. See below.

The following is what Viv wrote for me this morning, the day Moshe was buried in Melbourne, Australia,

Moshe Fiszman passed away aged 97  May 13, 2019
 
Moshe Fiszman, at 17 years of age, was a young man who suddenly became the  sole carer for his family in the ghetto at Radom, Poland.
 
For the next five years Moshe was interned as a slave labourer at five different Concentration camps including Auschwitz.
 
As Moshe would say “How I survived I will never know “.  He did survive and went on to be a caring husband of his wife now 99 and a loving father to his two daughters.
 
Moshe gave his testimony on a regular basis to the Aboriginal men in drug and alcohol recovery as part of the program I devised to help these men learn about William Cooper and to witness a role model in Moshe, a man who survived against all the odds.
 
Moshe told of the day, lying in the snow with the last of the survivors after a final “Death“ march, he realised they were finally free; the Nazis had fled, fearing the advancing Russian Army.
 
Freedom after five and a half years meant no family, no country, no future.  He wept for twenty four hours, then picked himself up and decided to go on.  His mission was to search for any remaining family members. 
 
Most importantly, though, his mission was to tell what really happened during the Holocaust, to make sure those who were murdered were honoured by his telling their story and to keep their memory alive.
 
Now it is Moshe’s story that must be kept alive. I am hopeful in my own small way, through my film Ties that Bind, Moshe’s story will inspire and will be shared, and it will honour his family and all those who perished, for generations to come.
 
May his name and his memory be as a blessing.
 
Viv Parry
Melbourne, Australia
 

Ties That Bind

Ties That Bind

A short documentary conversation between Uncle Boydie (Alf Turner) – grandson of Indigenous activist William Cooper, and Moishe Fiszman – a Holocaust survivor … This movie was mad…

Source: elirab.me/ties-that-bind/

Filmed by Justin Olstein

Ties that Bind forms an important introduction to our WE ARE HERE! Project for Upstanders, starting in Australia in August 2019:

WE ARE HERE! For Upstanders

WE ARE HERE! For Upstanders

Source: wah.foundation

This program is sponsored by a cultural grant from the U.S. Department of State

Holocaust Commemoration: An Australian Perspective

Updated articles
Kristallnacht Commemoration Perth 2018 | tangential travel
Uncle Boydie and Moishe Fiszman
VIDEO – MUST WATCH:

Source: youtu.be/1N700Olmw-U

Published in The Maccabean 16/11/18

Yom Hashoah Commemoration Perth 2018 | tangential travel

Photos
Ties that bind – A short documentary conversation

between Uncle Boydie (Alf Turner) – grandson of Indigenous activist William Cooper, and Moishe Fiszman – a Holocaust survivor …

This movie was made in Australia in 2017. It is also now part of the USHMM’s (Washington) collection.

Ties That Bind

VIDEO – MUST WATCH:

Source: youtu.be/1N700Olmw-U

Review and more info:

Watch “The Ties that Bind” from the Jewish Holocaust Centre | Hero Town

Source: www.herotowngeelong.com.au/watch-the-ties-that-bind-from-the-jewish-holocaust-centre/

Profile of Viv Parry, the director of Ties That Bind

Jewish Holocaust Centre – JHC Social Club: Viv Parry

Source: www.jhc.org.au/news-and-events/calendar-of-events/item/358-viv-parry.html

Ties That Bind – New Film – Barbara Miller Books

Ties That Bind – New Film – Barbara Miller Books

Source: barbara-miller-books.com/uncategorized/ties-that-bind-new-film/

Australia and the Holocaust:  A Koori Perspective                 by Gary Foley

Australia and the Holocaust: A Koori Perspective

In a way these people were perhaps unconsciously repaying the gesture of solidarity and empathy extended years before by William Cooper and his intrepid band of Koori resistance activists.

Source: www.kooriweb.org/foley/essays/essay_8.html

William Cooper 
The Aboriginal who stood up to Hitler

http://www.theaboriginalwhostooduptohitler.com/

On December 6, 1938, a fierce-gazed Indigenous man from the Murray River began a march from Southampton Street Footscray to make a simple demand for justice at government offices at 419-425 Collins Street, Melbourne. But this wasn’t a protest to defend Aborigines. It was a protest to defend Jews. And it wasn’t against a state government or Federal government. It was the German Government.

The protest was led by William Cooper. And 75 years after the event, it’s now clear that it was the only one of its kind. It’s something that didn’t happen in London, or in Paris or even in New York. It happened in Melbourne, organised by people who weren’t even citizens in their own country.

On that day, towards the end of his life, William Cooper stood up for the Jews of Europe. But as you’ll learn, it was only one of many astounding acts of justice this man made, even in his last years.

Who was William Cooper?

William Cooper was an Aboriginal. An activist. A unionist. A devout, Bible-reading, church-going, hymn-singing Christian.

Through his life, he worked as a shearer, a writer, a public speaker and, by the time he died in 1941, a political leader who could successfully demand a face-to-face meeting with the Prime Minister. As a man in his 70s, he started Australia’s first indigenous justice movement – the Australian Aborigines’ League. A movement which, long after his own death, would lead to the famous 1967 referendum.

But this was no communist radical. William Cooper was a Christian who believed the best thing that had happened for Australia’s first peoples was the Christian missions. He would argue passionately, often from the Bible, that Aboriginals ought to be treated as equal citizens in this country.

Once you learn where William Cooper came from, and how he came to stand up to injustice, you’ll wonder why you hadn’t heard of him before. But to begin, take a closer look at the day he challenged the Third Reich.

The March Against Tyranny

It was with his friends from the Australian Aborigines’ League that Cooper resolved to stand up to Hitler. It followed the night of “broken glass” on 9–10 November, 1938. In that terrifying 24 hours, Adolf Hitler’s brown shirts, the Sturmabteilung, rampaged through the streets of Germany looting, burning and smashing Jewish stores, buildings and synagogues. In just a few hours, nearly 100 Jews were killed and approximately 30,000 incarcerated in concentration camps.

Across the country, Australians were stunned as they read the stories in their newspapers. But Cooper stood up, gathered his Indigenous friends and family from Fitzory and Footscray, and they walked. Mind you, one of the reasons they walked was they had no money. In fact, Cooper was raising several grandkids in his home, and they didn’t even have electricity or gas. He’d rather spend it on ink, paper and stamps for his work for the Australian Aborigines’ League.

They arrived at the imposing stone building and climbed the stairs. He demanded a meeting with Doctor Drechsler, the General Consul of the Reichs Consulat – to speak against the Nazi mistreatment of Jews that had begun on Kristallnacht a few weeks before. But when they got to the door of the Reichs Consulate, the Nazi administration wouldn’t let them in.

Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, the world’s leading Holocaust research centre, says that, indeed, this protest was the only one of it’s kind in the world.

How did this happen? Why was it that – of all minority groups who could have stood up for the Jews in the 1930s – it was an Aboriginal man from one of the smallest tribes who made a stand? What drove this man, who could have been spending his twilight years fishing for Murray Cod in the Barmah Forest, to become a man who meddled in matters of state? What gave him the temerity to speak against the German Reich?

William Cooper (Aboriginal Australian) – Wikipedia

William Cooper (Aboriginal Australian) – Wikipedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Cooper_(Aboriginal_Australian)

Articles by Stan Marks

Stan Marks – Wikipedia

Stan Marks – Wikipedia

Stan Marks is an Australian writer and journalist. He is the husband of Holocaust survivor Eva Marks.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stan_Marks

The Order Of Proceedings
Kaddish led by Rabbi Adi Cohen

Kaddish led by Rabbi Adi Cohen

Kristallnacht Commemoration Temple David Perth 11 November 2018

Source: youtu.be/MOLcirmSvIo

Oseh Shalom

Oseh Shalom

Oseh Shalom sung by PLC Choir at Temple David Synagogue, Perth 11 November 2018

Source: youtu.be/R6v1Gp-aznw

https://www.plc.wa.edu.au/discover-plc/music-the-arts/music/

See also:

Lore Zusman talks about Königsberg:

.com/watch?v=i5zt7lArLq8

Kristallnacht 80 Years On

 

Commemorating Kristallnacht | tangential travel

Commemorating Kristallnacht | tangential travel

Königsberg Synagogue

Lore Zusman was born in Königsberg 90 years ago. Here are her memories of the Königsberg Synagogue, Kristallnacht and a book presented to her mother after the synagogue was destroyed on Kristallnacht in 1938. Königsberg / Kaliningrad KehilaLink with links to the synagogue and Kristallnacht. Hear Erika Sternberg’s story on Kristallnacht in Breslau. Click on her image. Commemoration in Perth – 9 November 2016 Just received: An email from Susan Taube of the USHHM I was only 12 years old when the Nazis ransacked Jewish homes and buildings in my neighborhood on Kristallnacht, “The Night of Broken Glass.” They took my father away to Buchenwald. My mother, sister, and I didn’t know if we would ever see him again. Our front door was smashed, our books torn apart, our dishes shattered. And with my father gone, we were left to pick up the pieces. This week marks the 78th anniversary of that terrible

Source: elirab.me/commemorating-kristallnacht/

Kristallnacht Commemoration Perth 2018 | tangential travel

Yom Hashoah Commemoration Perth 2018 | tangential travel

 Sara Kogan-Lazarus sings Tsi Darf Es Azoy Zayn 

Sara Kogan-Lazarus sings Tsi Darf Es Azoy Zayn

Filmed at Yom Hashoah Commemoration Perth, Australia 15 April 2018 Yiddish

Source: youtu.be/iOZqDWK0AkE

Lore Zusman – Kristallnacht

Lore Zusman – Kristallnacht

Yom Hashoah 15 April 2018 Perth Australia

Source: www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5zt7lArLq8

Source: elirab.me/yh18/

Ties that bind – A short documentary conversation

between Uncle Boydie (Alf Turner) – grandson of Indigenous activist William Cooper, and Moishe Fiszman – a Holocaust survivor …

This movie was made in Australia in 2017. It is also now part of the USHMM’s (Washington) collection.

Ties That Bind

Source: youtu.be/1N700Olmw-U

Review and more info:

Watch “The Ties that Bind” from the Jewish Holocaust Centre | Hero Town

Source: www.herotowngeelong.com.au/watch-the-ties-that-bind-from-the-jewish-holocaust-centre/

Profile of Viv Parry, the director of Ties That Bind

Jewish Holocaust Centre – JHC Social Club: Viv Parry

Source: www.jhc.org.au/news-and-events/calendar-of-events/item/358-viv-parry.html

 

Remembrance and Renewal | tangential travel

Remembrance and Renewal | tangential travel

Reprinted from The Jerusalem Post By RICHARD SHAVEI-TZION (My wife Jill’s cousin) 1 January 2015 Remembrance and Renewal How a song survived the Holocaust, traveled around the world and returned to the city of its birth. The Ramatayim Men’s Choir of Jerusalem.. (photo credit:JURGEN ALBRECHT) The 10 Tevet fast is designated as a “general Kaddish day” for those whose relatives died in the Holocaust and whose date of death is unknown. But it is not only people who disappeared without a trace in the Holocaust; many of their magnificent achievements across the gamut of human endeavor were lost to humanity. One of the great accomplishments of German and other European communities destroyed in the conflagration of World War II was the magnificent performance of Jewish liturgical music composed in the 19th and 20th centuries.Fortunately, unlike great works of visual art, music can be written and copied.Thus, although great composers, cantors and choristers were murdered and

Source: elirab.me/remembrance-and-renewal/

Ties That Bind

A short documentary conversation between Uncle Boydie (Alf Turner) – grandson of Indigenous activist William Cooper, and Moishe Fiszman – a Holocaust survivor …

This movie was made in Australia in 2017. It is also now part of the USHMM’s (Washington) collection.

It is worth the watch!

Ties That Bind

Source: youtu.be/1N700Olmw-U

Review and more info:

Watch “The Ties that Bind” from the Jewish Holocaust Centre | Hero Town

At Hero Town, it is our utmost priority to empower people to stand up in the face of adversity and injustice. It was our immense honour, then, that we were invited to the premiere of a documentary directed by Viv Parry titled Ties that Bind: From Auschwitz to Cummeragunja. We spent the full day at the Jewish Holocaust Centre and we left feeling deeply affected, saddened at the tragedy but also awed at the tales of survival, heroism, and resilience that we were invited to share.

Source: www.herotowngeelong.com.au/watch-the-ties-that-bind-from-the-jewish-holocaust-centre/

Profile of Viv Parry, the director of Ties That Bind

Jewish Holocaust Centre – JHC Social Club: Viv Parry

Source: www.jhc.org.au/news-and-events/calendar-of-events/item/358-viv-parry.html