75th Anniversary of the Liquidation of the Vilna Ghetto

Day of Victims of the Genocide of Lithuanian Jews in PonarY

23 September 2018 

Israel Ambassador – Amir Maimon        Photo credit: Ana Maizel

Lietuvos žydų genocido aukų dienos minėjimas Paneriuose – Vilniaus “Saulėtekio” vidurinė mokykla

Zog Nit Keynmol – WE ARE HERE!

Zog Ni Keynmol Ponar

Video by Carol Hoffman

Source: youtu.be/J4qGGMTOoxA

Vilnius “Saulėtekis” School Youth Choir and 3rd grade pupils participated.

Source: www.sauletekio.lt/naujienos/lietuvos-zydu-genocido-auku-dienos-minejimas-paneriuose/

Pope honours victims of Holocaust, Soviet terror in Lithuania

Pope honours victims of Holocaust, Soviet terror in Lithuania

Pope Francis on Sunday paid homage to Holocaust victims who perished in the Vilnius ghetto, 75 years to the day after the Nazis liquidated it, and remembered those who risked and lost their lives to challenge the Soviet regime in Lithuania.

Source: au.news.yahoo.com/pope-francis-honours-holocaust-victims-lithuania-115758110–spt.html

Who Are Lithuania’s Heroes Today? Å kirpa, Noreika or the Righteous Gentiles?

Who Are Lithuania’s Heroes Today? Å kirpa, Noreika or the Righteous Gentiles?

Former ghetto prisoners, members of the Lithuanian Jewish Community, members of international Jewish organizations, ambassadors from Israel and other countries

Source: www.lzb.lt/en/2018/09/24/who-are-lithuanias-heroes-today-skirpa-noreika-or-the-righteous-gentiles/

WE ARE HERE! For Upstanders Project

WE ARE HERE! For Upstanders

Source: wah.foundation

Vilna Ghetto

Vilna Ghetto – Wikipedia

The Vilna Ghetto[a] was a World War II Jewish ghetto established and operated by Nazi Germany in the city of Vilnius in the territory of Nazi-administered Reichskommissariat Ostland.[1] During the some two years of its existence, starvation, disease, street executions, maltreatment, and deportations to concentration camps and extermination camps reduced the Ghetto’s population from an estimated 40,000 to zero. Only several hundred people managed to survive, mostly by hiding in the forests surrounding the city, joining Soviet partisans,[2][3] or sheltering with sympathetic locals.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vilna_Ghetto