Ray’s 20th Yahrzeit

Ray (Raele) Zeldin Rabinowitz’s 20th Yahrzeit tonight, 4th Av

To play Mamele on Facebook, click here:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1apa14aHbWWxg3hNaVAy3wJqHyMR-wKHt/view?usp=sharing

Momele by Cantor Yanky Lemmer – 2 July 2015

Ray was born on 11 May 1919 in Dvinsk, now Daugavpils, Latvia.

She passed away on 24 July 2001 in Cape Town, South Africa

Ray passed away on 24 July 2001.

The last photo

Academic Article on Orla by Wojciech Konończuk

Author: Wojciech Konończuk — political scientist and historian, deputy director of the Centre for Eastern Studies in Warsaw; specializes in problems of contemporary Eastern European countries, the history of Jews in the Russian Empire and the Second Polish Republic, and deportations of Polish citizens to Siberia during the Second World War. Contact: wojtekk7@wp.pl

Heinrich, Marek, Ray, Eli, Jill & Wojciech at the Orla Synagogue in 2012
Wykazuja_najwyzsza_sklonnosc_do_emigrac (1)

English Translation (Google)

Wojciech Article Adademia Eng Trans
Extract from the above article

Page 7

605

“They show the highest tendency to emigrate” thousands of other migrants from Lithuania. According to the census of 1911, 47 thousand Jews lived in South Africa, many of whom were Lithuanians, although there were also Jews from Podlasie.

Nachum Mendel Skaryszewski (Rabinowitz) & his brother,  Moshe Zalman Rabinowitz from Orla

An example is Nachum Mendel Skaryszewski from Orla, who first emigrated to Palestine, from where in 1911  he moved to South Africa. After a few years, he was joined by his brother, sister and several other residents of his native shtetl (20) .

Migration level of Jews was so significant that already in 1895,  there were voices calling until the border is closed to them, and South Africa playfully was called the “colony of Lithuania” 21 .

Relatively little popularity before the outbreak of World War I, Palestine, which was part of the Ottoman Empire, enjoyed this manski, where in the first (1882-1903) and second (1904-1914) aliji came over 40 thousand. Russian Jews, including 23,000 in years 1905–1914 22 . They came mainly from the Ukrainian lands, in the most more affected by pogroms at the beginning of the 20th century. Funds from numerous Zionist organizations were gathered to buy land in Palestine, and one of the largest was founded in 1912. Białystok Society Land purchase, supporting the departures of Białystok Jews 23 . As it follows, according to the findings of Gur Alroey, emigration to Palestine was caused by not only the idea of ​​Zionism, but this area was also seen as a potential attractive place to live, and thus the reasons for emigration did not differ from those related to going to the USA 24 . Interesting there is also the level of returns from Palestine, possibly emigration from there to the US or another country was very high and in the period before at the outbreak of World War I, it ranged from 50 to 75 percent. 25  It was from a difficult climate, poverty, limited possibilities of finding work, relative proximity to the migrants’ place of origin, but also disenchantment with Zionism 26 .

20  E. Rabinowitz, Personal Journeys. From One Photograph to Journeys of Research and Discovery , Avotayline Online, August 31, 2016, http://avotaynuonline.com/2016/08/from-one-photograph-to-journeys-of-research-and-discovery (access: February 17, 2020).

21  A. Żukowski, Konsekwencje , p. 128; HR Diner, Roads Taken , p. 36.

22  G. Alroey, An Unpromising Land , p. 110.

23  R. Kobrin, Żydowski Białystok and its diaspora , Sejny – Białystok 2014, pp. 67–68.

24  G. Alroey, An Unpromising Land , pp. 61, 233.

25  Ibid, pp. 211-217, 236.

Also further down in the article

610

Wojciech Konończuk

Table 2. Emigration of inhabitants of Bielsko and Orla to the USA in the years 1885–1914

It should be emphasized that the above calculations do not give the full picture Jewish emigration from both localities, and only provide information about confirmed newcomers to the United States. Uses- the scanned numbers are certainly far from complete for several reasons.

Firstly, as already mentioned, in relation to some of the migration documents, However, the record of a person’s place of origin is unclear or it was written distorted. Thus, it made it impossible the identification of all emigrants from both places.

Secondly, the data included in the table do not include migration from Bielsko and Orla to other countries, which – if data for departures of Jews from the Empire are accepted Russian – was 22 percent. -all migrants.

We have source confirmation of emigration in both surveyed towns Jews living there to Argentina, South Africa and Palestine 43 .

Third, many Jews from smaller towns were leaving, the most first to larger cities, then emigrate from there abroad nothing. As a result, American migration statistics often show their whereabouts, not of origin, appeared. In case of Bielsko and Orla, such a natural center was Białystok 44, 50 km away .

43  For example: in 1905, Aryeh Levin from Orla (1885-1969) emigrated to Palestine, in later years a famous rabbi and teacher; in 1907, Bielski left for Argentina Jew Dawid Abraham Gail (R. Gail, The Gail Family. From Bielsko to Argentina and the USA , “Bielski Hostineć “2019, 2, pp. 63–64); 

in 1911 the above-mentioned Nachum Mendel Skaryszewski, and shortly after him, several other Orla residents emigrated to South Africa                    (E. Rabinowitz, op. Cit.).

Rabinowitz Eli, Personal Journeys. From One Photograph to Journeys of Research and Disco- very, Avotayline Online, 31 VIII 2016, http://avotaynuonline.com/2016/08/ from-one-photograph-to-journeys-of-research-and-discovery (dostęp: 17 II 2020).

A Tragic Romance & Finding Mr Katz
by Eli rabinowitz

A Tragic Romance & Finding Mr Katz

This story is divided into: A Tragic Romance (From One Photograph to Journeys of Research & Discovery) and Finding Mr Katz   Finding Mr Katz by Eli Rabinowitz Finding Mr Katz is an importa…

Source: elirab.me/litvak-portal/a-tragic-romance/

Heinrich, Marek, Ray, Eli, Jill & Wojciech at the Orla Synagogue 2012

Contact: eli@elirab.com

Afrikaner-Jewish relationship ((Part 1)

How true a reflection of the Afrikaner-Jewish relationship was the pre-1948 antisemitism of the Afrikaner Press and Politicians? ((Part 1) – SA Jewish Board of Deputies

How true a reflection of the Afrikaner-Jewish relationship was the pre-1948 antisemitism of the Afrikaner Press and Politicians? ((Part 1) – SA Jewish Board of Deputies

East European Jews en route to South Africa, Rosh Hashanah 1903

Ivan Kapelus considers the respective histories and complex relationship between of two distinct South African communities

Source: www.sajbd.org/media/how-true-a-reflection-of-the-afrikaner-jewish-relationship-was-the-pre-1948-antisemitism-of-the-afrikaner-press-and-politicians-part-1

The former Calvinia synagogue, now a museum (Courtesy: SA Friends of Beth Hatefutsoth)
Boer graves and monument, Krugersdorp concentration camp

Online Jewish Genealogical Society Talk

Online Jewish genealogy resources to be focus of Jewish Genealogical Society talk on 23 May 2021

Online Jewish genealogy resources to be focus of Jewish Genealogical Society talk on 23 May 2021

Eli Rabinowitz, a board member of the IAJGS who lives in Australia and is from South Africa, will speak on “Journeys from Shtetl to Shtetl” for the Sunday, 23 May 2021, virtual meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois. His live streaming presentation will begin at a special time: 7:30 pm CST.

8:30 pm ES 5:30 pm WST

Monday 24 May 2021: 10:30 am Sydney, 8:30 am Perth, 3:30 am Israel, 2:30 am South Africa, 1:30 am UK

Registration https://jgsi.org/event-3988686

After you register, you will be sent a link to join the meeting. This webinar will be recorded so that JGSI’s paid members who are unable to view it live will be able to view the recording later.

For more information, see https://jgsi.org or phone 312-666-0100.

In his presentation, Rabinowitz will explain how to trace our past and plot our future, using 88 KehilaLinks, over 800 WordPress blog entries, Facebook posts, and other social media. He will also discuss heritage travels in the actual and virtual worlds.

In his talk, Eli will describe special events including commemorations and reunions of descendants. “An important activity is to visit a local school—either physically or online, to engage with students, especially in towns where a few buildings with Jewish symbols, or cemeteries that often contain illegible matsevot, are the only tangible memories of a once thriving community,” he said.

It is also important that family histories should be documented and shared at the same time as the special events, Eli said.

Examples of such recent ceremonies were the Bielski partisans’ descendants’ reunion in Naliboki and Navahrudak, Belarus; the new memorial for victims of the massacre that took place near Birzai, Lithuania; and the groundbreaking ceremony for the Lost Shtetl Museum in Šeduva, Lithuania.

Eli Rabinowitz was born in Cape Town, South Africa, and has lived in Perth, Australia, since 1986. He has researched his family’s genealogy and associated Jewish cultural history for over 30 years. Eli has travelled extensively, writing about Jewish life, travel, and education on his website, Tangential Travel and Jewish Life (http://elirab.me). He writes and manages dozens of JewishGen KehilaLinks and more than 750 WordPress blog posts. His articles have appeared in numerous publications, including Avotaynu: The International Review of Jewish Genealogy. Eli has lectured internationally at educational institutions, commemorative events, at IAJGS and other conferences, and online.

He is a board member of the IAJGS—The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies, an independent non-profit umbrella organization that coordinates an annual conference of 84 Jewish genealogical societies worldwide.

Eli also advises on Litvak and Polish heritage tours.

He writes and manages 88 KehilaLinks—Jewish websites for JewishGen.org, the world’s largest Jewish genealogical organization, with a database of 500,000 followers. His KehilaLinks include sites in Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Belarus, Germany, Russia, China, Mauritius, Mozambique, South Africa and Australia.

The Jewish Genealogical Societyof Illinois is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping members collect, preserve, and perpetuate the records and history of their ancestors. JGSI is a resource for the worldwide Jewish community to research their Chicago-area roots. The JGSI motto is “Members Helping Members Since 1981.” The group has more than 300 members and is affiliated with the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies.

JGSI members have access to useful and informative online family history research resources, including a members’ forum, more than 65 video recordings of past speakers’ presentations, monthly JGSI E-News, quarterly Morasha JGSI newsletter, and much more. Members as well as non-members can look for their ancestors on the free searchable JGSI Jewish Chicago Database.

KODAK Digital Still Camera

New Memorial Orla Poland 2021

Ray @ 102 Colorized

Celebrating what would have been my mother Raele (Ray) Zeldin Rabinowitz’s 102 birthday. Ray was born on 11 May 1919 in Dvinsk, now Daugavpils, Latvia.

These colour photos were originally in b/w. I used MyHeritage.com’s Colorized to bring them to life!

 

  

The photos below are in their original colour.

Ray passed away on 24 July 2001 in Cape Town.

The last photo

Yom Hashoah Global

8 April 2021
HAMEC has once again partnered with the WE ARE HERE! Foundation to bring a streamed video event for Yom HaShoah.
The “Yom HaShoah Global Commemoration,” featuring schools, students, and speakers (including HAMEC speakers Daniel Goldsmith and Ruth Hartz) from around the world, will premiere on YouTube on Thursday, April 8th at 9am EDT.  (11pm Sydney, 9pm Perth, 2pm London, 6am PST)
Watch this youtube page (https://www.youtube.com/c/elirab52/) or look for another post from us linking to the streamed premiere.
ORT Kishinev Moldova
We are featuring the following schools on this Yom Hashoah presentation:
Sholem Aleichem College, Melbourne Australia
Ellenbrook Secondary College, Perth Australia
Carmel School Perth Australia
King David School, Victory Park South Africa
Herzlia School, Cape Town South Africa
ORT Dimcho Debelianov Hebrew and English Language School, Sofia Bulgaria
ORT Technology Lyceum, Kishinev Moldova
ORT Tekhiya, Moscow Russia
JDS Seattle, USA
JPEF – Jewish Partisans’ Educational Foundation, San Fransisco
Survivors:
Mrs Miriam Lichterman
Mr. Daniel Goldsmith
Ms Ruth Hartz
Student contributors:
Maria O – ORT Tekhiya
Ben Zar, Eron Norrie, Daniel Marsden, Shallya Samakosky, Jonty Schkolne & Rachel Wohlman – Herzlia School
Julia K – JDS Seattle

Thanks to:
Sholem Aleichem College
Conductor Ilana Perlich
Pianist Tomi Kalinski
Grade 5 & 6 students
Production – Kreative Solutionz, Samuel Strunin
The JCCV, Randi Grose, Michael Cohen, Fredl Mrocki
Stuart Rhine-Davis – Ellenbrook Secondary College
Michele Galanti – Carmel School
Kirsten Kukard, Mark Helfrich & Ivor Joffe – Herzlia School
Mandy-Reine Gruzd & Nikki Richard – King David Victory Park
Nance Adler – JDS Seattle 
Stela Dinkova – ORT Sofia 
Anna Zaytseva – ORT Tekhiya Moscow 
Anna Kurilova – ORT Kishinev 
Noongar translation: Jesse J Fleay – Edith Cowan University, Perth
Musical arrangement – Suzanne Kosowitz, Perth