Now Is The Time To Visit Jewish Lithuania

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Just launched:

The essential 36 page guide to visiting Jewish Lithuania and its ten key sites which highlight Jewish history and cultural heritage. This is the project of AEPJ European Routes of Jewish Heritage, published by the private Institute for Tourism Development and financed by the Lithuanian Jewish Commuity’s Good Will  Foundation.

One of the sites featured is Kedainiai, previously known as Keidan, a town of great Jewish importance. Keidan just also happens to be my Litvak shtetl!

All you need to build the perfect tour is more information on your own shtetl, and someone familiar with the territory to help you with your shtetl research, itinerary and bookings!

For all this and more, please contact me at eli@elirab.com

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For more details on the guide, click Kedainiai Kehilalink.

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Regards

Eli
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4 Replies to “Now Is The Time To Visit Jewish Lithuania”

  1. Actually, the guide to 10 key Jewish heritage sites was published by the private Institute for Tourism Development and financed by the Lithuanian Jewish Commuity’s Good Will Foundation. AEPJ has linked to it as part of its European Routes project.

  2. My gggrandfather, Shlomo Zalman Steinberg and his wife Sarah Millman lived in Kadainiai. They never left Lithuania . I know nothing about them except that he was a scholar and had a smicha. His son, Yisroel Tzadok, b. 1837, a Rav Hagaon, was the first in the family to leave Lithuania and come to NYC in 1883 from Raseiniai.

    I know nothing about their life in those cities in the 19th C, or about any other members of that, or earlier generations of the family, but unfortunately, I am not a traveler.

    Do you think the family had originally come from a more western country
    , perhaps Germany, because the names are not Russian?

    1. Many of our surnames came to Lithuania via Yiddish, although they sound German. eg my Kaplan family lived in Ariogala and later Kedainiai – and Kaplan is Yiddish/German for priest (ie cohen).

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