My Jo’burg Talk on 15 Feb, CT on 9 Feb

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Eli Rabinowitz talks on Exploring our Roots: A Contemporary Journey back to the Shtetl

When
Sunday February 15, 2015 from 7:30 PM to 9:30 PM SAST
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Where

HOD Centre
58 Oaklands Road
Orchards
Johannesburg 2192
South Africa
Driving Directions

Eli was born in Cape Town, has lived in Perth since 1986. He is proactive in a wide range of community activities including filming events, genealogical research, writing Kehilalinks websites for JewishGen, and his blog, lectures and presentations on his extensive worldwide Jewish heritage travel and photography. 


Eli brought the Memories of Muizenberg Exhibition to Australia and spoke at both the Sydney and Perth opening events.


Invitation Link: Invitation

Links:

To register or RSVP click on the link below:

Note – due to system generation the price is shown as $ US Dollars but is actually SA Rands
Register Now!
Download the latest copy of 
the official newsletter of the JGSSA
 
Please note:
  • The cost of attending each event is usually R20 per person for non-members and includes refreshments
  • To join the JGSSA costs R120 per person or R150 per couple per annum and includes free entry to each event.
  • IF YOU LIVE OUTSIDE JOHANNESBURG YOU CAN STILL JOIN AND PLANS ARE BEING MADE TO SPREAD TO CAPE TOWN AND DURBAN
If you want to join the JGSSA click here to send an email and we will send you an invoice.
Membership for 2015 is now open and you can send your details in as soon as you like.
You can make payment per EFT for the event and our banking details are:

Jewish Genealogical Society of South Africa

Standard Bank 

Account Number: 007 022 352 

If you have any questions about the event or how to register contact the organisers as per the details below.
Thank you for your attention and response, we look forward to seeing them at the event.
Sincerely,
Hannah Karpes
Jewish Genealogical Society of South Africa
A reminder about my Cape Town presentation on 9 Feb

sajm

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The SA Jewish Museum invites you to a talk by Eli Rabinowitz
Exploring our Litvak Roots

A contemporary journey back to the shtetl and a guide to accessing our shared heritage

Join us on this photographic journey taken over four years.Unlock the mysteries of Jewish life in Central and Eastern Europe, both past and present.

Rabinowitz born in Cape Town and now living in Perth, is proactive in a wide range of community activities, including filming events, genealogical research, writing Kehilalinks websites for JewishGen, and his blog, lectures and presentations on his extensive worldwide Jewish heritage travel and photography.

Date: Monday, 9 February 2015

Time: 18h00

Venue: 88 Hatfield Street, Gardens

RSVP: info@sajewishmuseum.co.za

Refreshments will be served.

We look forward to seeing you there!

The SA Jewish Museum Team

Perth – The First Australian KehilaLink

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The first Australian Kehilalink is now up and running.

The new Perth website about Jewish life is now live and can be accessed at:

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/perth

or click on this image:

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Thanks to Michelle Urban for the hundreds of  PHC images and to David Adonis for the Maccabi photos.

Some examples of the Maccabi images:

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Images taken in 2012 from the PHC collection.

PHCG 258 3 Rabbi s-Jan2012 PHCG 380 PHCP 2012 Jayke Barmitzvah (Courtesy Julie Kerbel) 162 PHCX0001F Anzac Day 2012 DSC_9297 PHCX096 Sacks Morning Minyan January 2012. (3) PHCX142 Chanuka 2012

Highlights of Chief Rabbi Mirvis’ visit in 2014

Rebbetzin Valerie and Chief Rabbi Mirvis, Rabbi Dovid and Aviva Freilich. Photo by Sas
Rebbetzin Valerie and Chief Rabbi Mirvis, Rabbi Dovid and Aviva Freilich. Photo by Sas
Chief Rabbi Mirvis
Chief Rabbi Mirvis
Rabbi Dovid Freilich
Rabbi Dovid Freilich

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Meeting Rabbi Sholem Coleman

CHABAD highlights of Chief Rabbi Mirvis’ visit in 2014

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Zvi Friedl
Zvi Friedl

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My Upcoming Cape Town Talk

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The SAJM invites you to a captivating talk by Eli Rabinowitz.
View this email in your browser

The SA Jewish Museum invites you to a talk by Eli Rabinowitz
Exploring Our Litvak Roots

A contemporary journey back to the shtetl and a guide to accessing and sharing our heritage.

Join us on this photographic journey taken over four years.Unlock the mysteries of Jewish life in Central and Eastern Europe, both past and present.

Eli Rabinowitz, born in Cape Town and now living in Perth, is proactive in a wide range of community activities, including filming events, genealogical research, writing KehilaLinks websites for JewishGen, and his blog, lectures and presentations on his extensive worldwide Jewish heritage travel and photography.

Date: Monday, 9 February 2015

Time: 18h00

Venue: 88 Hatfield Street, Gardens

RSVP: info@sajewishmuseum.co.za

Refreshments will be served.

We look forward to seeing you there!

The SA Jewish Museum Team

Copyright © 2015 SA Jewish Museum, All rights reserved.

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Chief Rabbi Shlomo Goren’s Visit to South Africa in August 1973

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Photos Found

Israel’s Chief Rabbi Shlomo Goren came to South Africa for the sixth national conference of the Federation of Synagogues of South Africa, held in Johannesburg August 16-19 and attended by delegates from all parts of the country. A capacity audience heard his keynote address, which dealt with religious issues affecting Israel and its people and supported the state’s attitude towards peace with the Arab states.

Text: http://www.ajcarchives.org/AJC_DATA/Files/1983_11_SAfrica.pdf

Chief Rabbi Goren also visited Cape Town, where these photos were taken.

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Thanks to Abe Gulis for locating these photos in Israel.

 

 

Remembrance and Renewal

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Reprinted from The Jerusalem Post

By RICHARD SHAVEI-TZION (My wife Jill’s cousin)

Remembrance and Renewal

One of the great accomplishments of German and other European communities destroyed in the conflagration of World War II was the magnificent performance of Jewish liturgical music composed in the 19th and 20th centuries.Fortunately, unlike great works of visual art, music can be written and copied.Thus, although great composers, cantors and choristers were murdered and splendid synagogues were burned to the ground, many of these choral and cantorial works were saved by the publication and distribution of musical scores before the war.Rather surprisingly, in the second half of the 20th century, the city of Cape Town at the southern tip of Africa was one of the vibrant centers of this Central European synagogue music. South African Jewry is quite rightly known as a Litvak community, mainly comprised of descendants of immigrants from Lithuania and other Eastern European countries. However, the first trickle of Jews arrived decades before the Litvaks, mainly from England and Germany.It was these pioneering Jews who set the tone in the Orthodox shuls that sprang up in the cities and small towns of South Africa, and they brought with them the music of the wonderful Central European composers.In 1965, I was drafted into the choir of the Gardens Shul as a young boy soprano. This grand edifice, known as South Africa’s “Mother Synagogue,” set in leafy, shaded gardens with the majestic Table Mountain as a backdrop, featured the warmest cavernous acoustic. I was spellbound by the harmonic four-voice settings to passages from the siddur and mahzor – none more than “ Zacharti Lach ,” sung on Rosh Hashana as composed by Louis Lewandowski (1821- 1894), who served for many decades in Berlin as the age’s first synagogue choir conductor, and was perhaps the greatest of the composers of this genre.The sublime words of Jeremiah describing God’s love for the youthful Jewish people, who devotedly followed Moses out of Egypt into the wilderness, are echoed in the piece, evoking a haunting, nostalgic longing.The impact of this initial choral experience was immediate and lasting. Fifty years later, I find myself directing Jerusalem’s Ramatayim Men’s Choir.

Over the past decade, the city of Berlin has made huge efforts to commemorate the Jewish community and its great social and cultural achievements before the Nazis obliterated this vibrant society. One such project is the annual Lewandowski Choral Festival. It was with great emotion that I received confirmation that our choir had been selected to participate in this significant event, and to sing “ Zacharti Lach ” at the closing concert.

For a number of our choristers, some of whose close relatives were murdered by the Nazis, the idea of participating in a cultural event in Germany was an anathema. However, after a number of intense discussions, many of these choristers came to the understanding that a Jewish choir from sovereign Jerusalem performing Lewandowski’s music in the heart of Berlin represented both a victory and a Kiddush Hashem (sanctification of God’s name).

More than anything, I believed we would be renewing the life force of our great culture in the heart of the society which tried, with great savagery, to snuff it out.

We joined six other ensembles from around the world for academic lectures, performances and a tour of the city that included the Jewish cemetery, which contains 150,000 graves. And as snow gently drifted across this vast place of commemoration, 150 choristers from Europe, Africa and Asia surrounded Lewandowski’s grave and sung his compositions, which resonate to this day.

The closing concert featuring all of the choirs was, by design, coincidence or cosmically bashert, scheduled for the afternoon of 10 Tevet. This concert did not take place at the Neue Synagogue, where Lewandowski served as choir master.

That 3,000-seat building was set ablaze on Kristallnacht in 1938 and although partly restored, was extensively damaged in the bombing of Berlin by the Allied forces in 1943. Rather, it took place at the magnificent Rykestrasse Synagogue – built in 1903, gutted on Kristallnacht and restored after the war – Germany’s largest synagogue at present.

On the way to the synagogue on a gloomy Berlin afternoon, we passed the sprawling Holocaust Memorial consisting of some 2,700 drab, featureless concrete blocks of varying heights in neat rows, symbolizing the bleak fate of the victims. I pointed out the significance of our presence especially on that day of remembrance, and asked our choristers to elevate their singing for those whose voices were snuffed out by the Nazis.

We walked up the steps of the ornate stone bima, flanked by two gilded menorahs and backed by an arched ark framed with filigree and marble pillars.

And it occurred to me that “ Zacharti Lach, ” this glorious mid-19th century tune, had found its way to England, from there to South Africa, then to Israel, and now we were about to sing it here in Berlin – where it had been created.

As we lifted our voices on that late December night in the elegant synagogue packed with 1,200 people, Jews and gentiles, to chant the soulful, poignant melody, I thought I heard the echo of a haunted past. But more than that, I felt the force of those of our people whose indomitable inspiration and spirit lives on in our music.

 

White Schooldays: Coming of Age In Apartheid South Africa

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A New Book:

White Schooldays: Coming-of-Age In Apartheid South Africa

 

by Ismé Bennie (Author)

Bennie

 

Ismé Bennie reflects on her life of privilege as a young white Jewish South African growing up during the tumultuous and unjust Apartheid era.

As a young girl she was not aware of how advantaged she was, she was a child at play under the South African sun.

White Schooldays is a reflection on the relative normalcy of Bennie’s life in the 1940s and 1950s – a life filled with her pets, family, school and friends. As a Jew, Bennie was a minority within a minority, but she still enjoyed the benefits of life as a white South African. Her everyday experiences stand in stark contrast to the suffering of the black community, the violence and discrimination that went on around her.

White Schooldays is Bennie’s homage to a way of life that was special and beautiful for those who were privileged to lead it. In this collection of pieces, with a strong Jewish thread running through it, she paints a picture of daily life as she remembers it.

But these memories are underscored with the political reality of the times!

 

Preview one of Isme’s stories, “George or Holidays By the Sea”, which appears in this book,

This story can be found on the Muizenberg KehilaLink here:

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http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/muizenberg/Isme_Bennie.html

 

About the Author

Ismé Bennie is a graduate of the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. She started her career as a librarian, but a move to Canada led her to become one of the most respected women in Canadian broadcasting. She has received numerous honors including the Canadian Film and Television Production Association Personal Achievement Award; the Jack Chisholm Lifetime Achievement Award; and the Toronto Women in Film and Television Outstanding Achievement Award.

Now writing full time, Bennie has published articles on a variety of topics, from food to crime fiction, and contributes to New York-based VideoAge International on Canadian media issues.

 

Paperback and Kindle available from Amazon.co

Product Details: December 10, 2014

Available through amazon.com

Paperback: 176 pages

Language: English

Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (December 10, 2014)

ISBN-10: 1500750085;       ISBN-13: 978-1500750084

Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item

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